Fertility Astrology: A Modern Medieval Textbook

Nicola Smuts-Allsop

£15.99

Despite incredible and previously undreamed-of advances in modern medicine, for many women the issue of infertility remains a heart-breaking reality. Using a combination of traditional and modern astrological techniques, the author has delved deeply into the charts of hundreds of infertile women, and in many cases has unravelled what might be at the root of the problem. Sometimes it’s a matter of location or timing, or it could be psychological issues in the relationship that are causing the block; whatever the reason, the author works closely with the couple – and often the medical profession – to produce results that are frequently positive where there has been no hope before.

Although this is an advanced textbook for astrologers, the human element of the case histories is nothing short of inspiring, and from that perspective can be enjoyed by readers with no knowledge of astrology.

Please note that in a few early copies of the book the table of Dorothean Triplicities on p.30 was incorrect. Here is the correct version:

Weight 300 g
  • ISBN 13: 9781910531259

Nicola Smuts-Allsop is a consulting astrologer living in the United Kingdom. Originally from South Africa, she completed her first studies at the Rod Suskin School of Astrology in Cape Town, and completed a Diploma in Medieval Astrology with AstroLogos in the UK. Nicola has recently graduated from Canterbury Christ Church University, with a Master’s Degree in Myth, Cosmology and The Sacred.

Nicola has specialised in this field and has undergone fertility treatment herself. She is a mother of two adult children and
can empathise and understand the pain and the desperation of trying to conceive. She lectures internationally on her fertility work and her research and methods in this field are pioneering and unique. Her success in diagnosing fertility issues in charts and finding potentially fertile times to try In Vitro Fertilisation (IVF) and other reproductive treatments has been published in The Sunday Times (London), The London Times, and The Daily Mail. Her work has also been featured on national television (Free Spirit, Top Billing) in South Africa.

Before Nicola Smuts-Allsop describes the advanced and detailed astrological techniques that she uses with her clients, she tells us the considerations that she employs to set the tone when beginning to work with a client, in the chapter entitled “Narrative Medicine and Fertility Myths.” The author is steeped in the importance of listening and being receptive to the client. “This receptivity is what shifts the encounter and, I suggest, moves it closer to becoming a situation of genuine healing.” Her intricate retelling of the story of Inanna as a fertility myth is fresh and evocative. This chapter might be seen as capturing the heart of her approach, and her point of view weaves through the client stories that follow.

Smuts-Allsop, the mother of two grown children, mentions her personal experience with infertility, which must inform her sensitive handling of infertility issues with clients. She has researched the astrology of infertility for 20 years and has had unusual access to fertility clinics, sometimes working directly with doctors. (In one startling example, she presents charts belonging to two different women who underwent IVF treatments on the same day and in the same location by the same doctor!) She writes knowledgeably and with considerable detail about specific medical issues that impact fertility, and she is conversant with the most sophisticated advances in modern medicine. Her astrological approach is strongly reliant on medieval techniques: She works with the Almuten of Pregnancy, based on a formula described by Omar of Tiberias in his Book of Nativities. She assesses the Triplicity ruler of the Ascendant for the phase of life and for the Almuten of Pregnancy. She also considers the heliacal rise star, the fixed stars, and their parans, in a process to help determine location, e.g., where conception and successful delivery will most likely take place. She looks at the parans to the Almuten of Pregnancy and those of Mercury. (A quick nod here to her creativity: “Mercury is the signifier for the doctor, the fallopian tubes, and the astrologer.”) Her techniques are varied; she sometimes also looks at the profected year, solar arc directions, solar returns, transits, midpoints, and firdaria. The author’s methods are revealed in three extensive case studies and three shorter studies. She then (helpfully) reviews the techniques and suggests common Signatures of Fertility, in a chapter that also discusses the Fourfold Hermeneutic of medieval thinkers. (If this is an unfamiliar concept to you, it is essentially a four-level framework for interpreting symbolism.) The chapter addresses the experience of practicing astrologers wherein “sometimes the symbolism is literal, sometimes it has a deeper resonance.”

Besides appreciating the author’s expertise with the complex issues surrounding fertility, I completely enjoyed her eclectic astrology. She integrates advanced medieval techniques with contemporary psychological insight (e.g., the physical and emotional issues that men deal with around fertility) and an undercurrent of myth, such as the recognition of the mythic heroic dimension in the lives of clients. There is a Glossary and Bibliography in this remarkable book that recounts Nicola Smuts-Allsop’s efforts, which have produced “results that are frequently positive where there has been no hope before.”

reviewed by Mary Plumb The Mountain Astrologer Dec/Jan 2018

 

 

This very well written, very well researched book is well worth studying (this is not something that you just read) for the advanced student or astrology professional. Definitely not for beginners – they will be lost.

This book is not just about fertility astrology. It is as much about the medieval systems as it is about fertility. In spiritual matters the medieval thinkers and philosophers are definitely ahead of us moderns. Those were different times. Everyone was pious in those days. Life centered around the church, synagogue, temple or ashram. There was a greater focus on theology than there is today. And, it seems to me they went deeper.

In Astrology though, the medievalists area mixed bag. They have some wonderful insights that are well worth incorporating into our thinking and practice. On the other hand, they didn’t use Uranus, Neptune and Pluto (which were not known in those days). Any practicing astrologer will attest to the power of these planets. They tended to be very fatalistic. Your fate is your fate and there is nothing you can do about it. (Not all the medievalists thought this way as the author shows, but most of them did.) Some of their terminology is also a bit objectionable. The use of the terms “malefic” and “benefic” are misleading. They imply a judgement of “good” or “bad”. Since each of the planets embodies – incarnates – a spiritual principle – each is essentially good – essentially Divine – a bringer of good. But some bring good though a “tough love” approach (Saturn, for example) and others bring good in a more pleasing kind of way. But they are all good. Terms such as pleasant or unpleasant, or easy and challenging are probably better.

The concept of the Almuten – a medieval concept – is most interesting and she explains it very well. It seems philosophically correct to me. In any area of life there is one planet that exerts the most force in that area – one planet which basically controls it – this is the Almuten. I also like the distinctions they make between a day chart and a night chart. This too seems philosophically correct. The use of the fixed stars and parans also ring true (but how much influence they have requires more study). By following the Almuten by transit and progression the astrologer can get a good handle on how the events of that area will go.
Her discussion involves many case histories and the charts are supplied. The reader should cast the charts and follow the discussion.

Her take on the healing virtues of the Horoscope was also very interesting – and true. The Horoscope will show the “personal myths” of the native. Unlike a medical diagnosis, it will show the meaning of the events that the native is facing. This in itself is a healing. This I have personally experienced many times. When the native understands the reasons for their difficulty they immediately get better (at least on the mental and emotional level).

I didn’t cast all the charts in her case histories – only a few. If I had more time I would have cast all of them. (It would have been nice to know where the natives were on the birthday prior to conception so that we can look at the Solar Return). It seems to me that we can see these things by modern methods (and philosophically correct methods). Why is it necessary to use profections, solar arcs, fidurias – which are of questionable philosophical underpinnings – when these same things can be seen in philosophically correct ways?

I also question the logic of the Dorothean Triplicity rulerships. Saturn as the ruler of Sagittarius, a fire sign? Mars as the ruler of Capricorn an earth sign? Probably there is some good reason for this, but I didn’t get it.

Having said all this, this is a very worthwhile book. The serious reader can apply her techniques not only to fertility astrology, but to many other areas of Astrology too – finance, love, health etc. It belongs in the book case of every practising Astrologer.

Joe Polansky Diamond Fire Magazine

 

Fertility  Astrology, by Nicola Smuts-Allsop, The Wessex Astrologer, www.wessexastrologer.com. 2018. Paper — 170 pp. — 15.99 British Sterling.

For some clients, fertility is an issue they’ll bring to you in consultation. What do you do with that issue? How much do we, as astologers, know about fertility anyway? Not a lot has been written about it in recent years, and some of the older books don’t quite hit the mark, it seems. Enter Nicola Smuts-Allsop. She has made fertility a specialty and has looked at literally hundreds of charts. Using a combination of traditional and modern techniques, she has come up with what she calls “A  Modern Medieval Textbook” on the subject.

Smuts-Allsop displays her teaching  in the form of case studies for the most part,  but there are also chapters on “Methods in Review” and “Signatures of Fertility” so you won’t lose track of the information. And for a fairly slim book, the information here is copious. I would also consider this an advanced textbook. The techniques here extend far beyond planets, signs, houses, and transits. Expect to learn something whether you were planning to or not.

For me, the big learning was about the Almuten of Pregnancy. I am not a medieval astrologer, and my knowledge of what an almuten was turned out to be sketchy at best. Working with the Almuten of Pregnancy clarified both my understanding of Almutens in general and the things to be considered in terms of pregnancy

And if you don’t know what an almuten is there  is a good glossary to put you in the right track. This also contains some medical terminology that you may need to be aware of if you’re going to study fertility issues.

A short bibliography rounds out the book covering everything from astrological topics to mythology to books that discuss things that can hinder infertility and assisted reproduction.

If you’re interested in this topic or have a lot of clients who are, I would recommend this volume highly. It is clear, concise, and highly readable.

— reviewed by Donna Van Toen November 2018

 

Book Review Horoscope Guide

December 2018

by Ronnie Dreyer

Fertility Astrology: A Modern Medieval Textbook, by Nicola Smuts-Allsop, The Wessex Astrologer, PO Box 9307 Swanage BH19 9BF, England, wessexastrologer.com. Paper. 170 pages, $22.00.

Many years ago, when I began my study of astrology, my first teacher advised me never to forecast if and when a woman would be able to conceive a child. He felt that practicing any form of birth control, including abstinence, alters the natural cycles and rhythms upon which astrology is based. As I established my consulting practice, I always remembered those words of wisdom, and yet I had to find a way to address the issue of fertility cycles. After all, conceiving a child is a primary concern of many female clients who will either get pregnant naturally, adopt a child, or undergo in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatments to conceive.

These are some of the issues that Nicola Smuts-Allsop addresses in her well-written, well-researched, and innovative book Fertility Astrology: A Modern Medieval Textbook. It fills an obvious gap in the existing astrological literature by providing interpretive and predictive techniques as well as practical advice for determining the timing of fertility cycles. These apply to women who wish to become pregnant as well as those confronting infertility caused or compounded by physical problems (including endometriosis and Fallopian-tube blockages), psychological issues, or because they are older and cannot conceive naturally.

The author uses case studies “…that demonstrate by example how to read charts for fertility questions…And while the departure point for all the delineations is based in the medieval tradition of astrology, the modern techniques you are more familiar with can come to play a role as the delineation proceeds.” She feels that medieval astrology “provides a unique suite of tools not available to modern practitioners” as well as “a proper knowledge of timing,” and that by utilizing these techniques “fear and stress are reduced, and the chances of success increase dramatically.”

In the first chapter the author discourages using the fertility method propounded by the late Dr. Eugen Jonas, who asserted that you are most fertile on the day when the Sun-Moon angle replicates your natal one, and that the sign the Moon occupies at conception could determine the child’s sex. While she introduces astrological techniques that she has discovered to work, Smuts-Allsop also encourages doing your own research to discover astrological signatures and timing methods that determine fertility, and to develop your own personal approach with your clients. She encourages first listening to what the client is trying to say and not just sticking to the technicalities of the chart.

Smuts-Allsop makes it clear that there should be “some sort of disclaimer at the beginning of the session so that your clients are clear about the limits of astrology and your limitations as a practitioner.” Finally, she stresses to never prescribe medications, herbs, or treatments without first consulting a medical practitioner.

In the following chapters, she describes fascinating, in-depth case studies of clients ranging from a 42-year old woman who after unsuccessfully attempting to conceive was ready to adopt, but eventually became pregnant naturally.  Another case involves two different women who underwent IVF treatment at the same clinic, while yet another is about a woman who failed to become pregnant even when the astrological factors seemed to be in her favor. Rather than initially reviewing each technique, the author prefers to teach through example and dives into the astrology chart, delineating planetary strengths and weaknesses using medieval techniques, which, though they may be unfamiliar, come alive to a modern audience due to the author’s ability as an astrologer and writer.

While I might have preferred reading an explanation of these terms prior to presenting the case studies, I completely understand her perspective that sometimes it is better to see these techniques in action and explain them as you go along. There will also be a sigh of relief for modern astrologers as the author describes several tried and true techniques including recognizing that Jupiter transits to the natal Ascendant, Sun, or Moon can often indicate the most reliable timing for conception.

After taking us through the lives of these clients, the author concludes with two chapters. The first of these, “Methods in Review,” explains many of the techniques and the methodology used in the previous case studies. Some will be familiar, including solar arcs, solar returns, transits, midpoints, and fixed stars. While other medieval techniques like almuten, hyleg, triplicity rulers, firdaria, and profections may be new to many readers, when understood and utilized they will add useful tools to every astrological toolbox. In the last chapter, “Signatures of Fertility,” she discusses the Moon in the signs (each of which is classified as fertile or barren), its aspects to the outer planets, and finally the sign position of Mercury, which the author uses to represent the Fallopian tubes.

In writing Fertility Astrology, and showing us through actual case studies how she works with clients, Nicola Smuts-Allsop has given us an intelligent, sensitive, and compassionate introduction to this sometimes difficult area of astrology. Anyone interested in learning more about this topic as well as astrologers who want to perfect their insights and skills, should purchase a copy of this book.